Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2021

Agreement in the CARTaGENE cohort between self-reported medication use and claim data

Authors: Cristiano Moura, Yves Payette, Catherine Boileau, Michal Abrahamowicz, Louise Pilote, Sasha Bernatsky

The research team investigated the agreement of self-reported medication use in CARTaGENE baseline data with provincial health insurance records. Overall, there was a reasonable agreement between the two data sources, but important variations were found for the different drug classes.

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2020

Social Jetlag and Prostate Cancer Incidence in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project: A Prospective Cohort Study

Authors: Liang Hu, Andrew Harper, Emily Heer, Jessica McNeil, Chao Cao, Yikyung Park, Kevin Martell, Geoffrey Gotto, Grace Shen-Tu, Cheryl Peters, Darren Brenner, Lin Yang

Social jetlag has been linked with obesity, metabolic disorders, and cardiovascular risk in previous research. This study assessed social jetlag in 7455 cancer-free men in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project and followed them for on average 9.6 years, 250 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The study found that the more social jetlag men experienced, the greater their prostate cancer risk was.

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2020

Prediction of Cardiovascular Events by Type I Central Systolic Blood Pressure

Authors: Florence Lamarche, Mohsen Agharazii, François Madore, Rémi Goupil

This study assessed which of central or brachial blood pressure best predicts cardiovascular risk and identified the central SBP threshold associated with increased risk of future cardiovascular events. It was concluded that central BP measured with a type I device is statistically but likely not clinically superior to brachial BP in a general population without prior cardiovascular disease.

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2020

Job strain and the incidence of heart diseases: A prospective community study in Quebec, Canada

Authors: Niamh Power, Soyna Deschenes, Floriana Ferri, Norbert Schmitz

CARTaGENE survey data linked with administrative data and Cox regression models were used to examine the association between job strain and heart disease, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioral and clinical factors, and depressive symptoms. It was found that job strain was associated with an increased risk of heart disease in middle-aged women and in men aged 50 years and older. This association was not accounted for by depressive symptoms or sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral factors.

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2020

The Importance of Cancer Registry Linkage for Studying Rare Cancers in Prospective Cohorts

Authors: Emily Maplethorpe, Emily V. Walker, Trenton Smith, Faith G. Davis, Yan Yuan

This research study evaluated the validity of self-reported cancer diagnosis in ATP by linking to the Alberta Cancer Registry. The first instance of self-reported cancer in a follow-up survey was compared to the first cancer diagnosis in the ACR after enrollment. The study found that rare cancers were less likely to be captured by active follow-up than common cancers.

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2020

Combinations of modifiable lifestyle behaviours in relation to colorectal cancer risk in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Dylan E. O’Sullivan, Amy Metcalfe, Troy W. R. Hillier, Will D. King, Sangmin Lee, Joy Pader, Darren R. Brenner

The researchers sought to identify distinct clusters of individuals that exhibit unique patterns of modifiable life-style related behaviours and determine how these patterns are associated with the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The team identified 7 unique behaviours where the cancer risk was 2.34-2.87 times higher for the high-risk groups than the low-risk groups.

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2020

Associations between Neighborhood Walkability, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease in Nova Scotian Adults: An Atlantic PATH Cohort Study

Authors: Melanie Keats, Yunsong Cui, Vanessa Declercq, Scott Grandy, Ellen Sweeney, Trevor Dummer

The study investigated the association between neighbourhood walkability and chronic disease. A cross-sectional study was used to determine that there were health protective benefits of higher levels of physical activity and a reduction in the prevalence of certain chronic diseases in areas where there was a higher walk score.

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2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

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2020

Diet Quality and Food Prices Modify Associations between Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity and Adiposity Outcomes

Authors: Hannah Yang Han, Catherine Paquet, Laurette Dubé, Daiva E Nielsen

This cross-sectional investigation geo-temporally linked CARTaGENE data with in-store retail food environment data to examine interactions between a polygenic risk score (PRS) for obesity and (1) diet quality (n = 6807) and (2) in-store retail food measures (n = 3718). The outcomes included adiposity-related measures and diet quality assessed using the 2010 Canadian-adapted Healthy Eating Index.

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2020

Assessing arsenic in human toenail clippings using portable X-ray fluorescence

Authors: David Fleming, Samantha Crook, Colby Evans, Michel Nader, Manuel Atia, Jason Hicks, Ellen Sweeney, Christopher McFarlane, Jong Song Kim, Erin Keltie, Anil Adsesh

Single toenail clippings from 60 Atlantic Canadian participants were assessed for arsenic using a new portable X-ray fluorescence approach. The portable XRF technique used in this study shows promise as a means of assessing arsenic concentration in toenail clippings.

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