Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2021

Psychosocial factors and cancer incidence (PSY-CA): Protocol for individual participant data meta-analyses

Authors: Lonneke van Tuijl, Adri Voogd, Alexander de Graeff, Adriaan Hoogendoorn, Adelita Ranchor, Kuan-Yu Pan, Maartje Basten, Femke Lamers, Mirjam Geerlings, Jessica Abell, Philip Awadalla, Marije Bakker, Aartjan Beekman, Ottar Bjerkeset, Andy Boyd, Yunsong Cui, Henrike Galenkamp, Bert Garssen, Sean Hellingman, Martijn Huisman, Anke Huss, Melanie Keats, Almar Kok, Annemarie Luik, Nolwenn Noisel, N. Charlotte Onland-Moret, Yves Payette, Brenda Penninx, Lützen Portengen, Ina Rissanen, Annelieke Roest, Judith Rosmalen, Rikje Ruiter, Robert Schoevers, David Soave, Mandy Spaan, Andrew Steptoe, Karien Stronks, Erik Sund, Ellen Sweeney, Alison Teyhan, Ilonca Vaartjes, Kimberly van der Willik, Flora van Leeuwen, Rutger van Petersen, Monique Verschuren, Frank Visseren, Roel Vermeulen, Joost Dekker

This study aims (1) to test whether psychosocial factors are associated with the incidence of any cancer; (2) to test the interaction between psychosocial factors and factors related to cancer risk with regard to the incidence of cancer; and (3) to test the mediating role of health behaviors in the relationship between psychosocial factors and the incidence of cancer.

Read Publication
2021

Examining the etiology of early-onset breast cancer in the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health (CanPath)

Authors: Joy Pader, Robert Basmadjian, Dylan O'Sullivan, Nicole Mealey, Yibing Ruan, Christine Friedenreich, Rachel Murphy, Edwin Wang, May Lynn Quan, Darren Brenner

The objective of this study was to investigate relationships between modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors and early-onset breast cancer among the BC Generations Project, Alberta’s Tomorrow Project and Ontario Health Study. In this study, measures of adiposity, pregnancy history, and familial history of breast cancer are important risk factors for early-onset breast cancer.

Read Publication
2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

Read Publication
2020

The Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds: How well does it reflect the Canadian population?

Authors: Ruth E. Hall, Natasa Tusevljak, C. Fangyun Wu, Quazi Ibrahim, Karleen Schulze, Anam M. Khan, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Trevor J.B. Dummer, Jason Hicks, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon K. Teo, Jennifer Vena, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia S. Anand, Jack V. Tu

The representativeness of the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds (CAHHM-HSR) cohort was evaluated by comparing to region matched respondents of the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey Rapid Response module (CCHS-RR). CAHHM-HSR participants were older, more often women, more likely Chinese, and had higher education, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and cardiac testing than the general Canadian population. Despite these differences, the INTERHEART risk score was similar.

Read Publication
2020

The Relationship of Sleep Duration with Ethnicity and Chronic Disease in a Canadian General Population Cohort

Authors: Mandeep Singh, Kelly Hall, Amy Reynolds, Lyle Palmer, Sutapa Mukherjee

This study used questionnaire data from the Ontario Health Study to determine how ethnicity-specific differences in sleep duration affect health outcomes. It was found that both sleep duration and ethnicity were independent significant predictors for various morbidities such as diabetes, stroke, and depression.

Read Publication
2020

Physical Activity is Associated With Reduced Prevalence of Self-Reported Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Large, General Population Cohort Study

Authors: Kelly Hall, Mandeep Singh, Sutapa Mukherjee, Lyle Palmer

The researchers used Ontario Health Study data to determine if physical activity would reduce the prevalence of OSA. Upon determining the prevalence of OSA, the reseachers were able to do a cross sectional analysis to determine that increased physical activity had a statistical significance of (P ≤ 0.045). Moderate activity did not have much of an impact on the prevalence of OSA. These results showed that increased physical activity would be a preventative measure for OSA.

Read Publication
2020

Reduced Cognitive Assessment Scores Among Individuals With Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Detected Vascular Brain Injury

Authors: Sonia S. Anand, Matthias G. Friedrich, Dipika Desai, Karleen M. Schulze, Philip Awadalla, David Busseuil, Trevor J.B. Dummer, Sébastien Jacquemont, Alexander Dick, David Kelton, Anish Kirpalani, Scott A. Lear, Jonathan Leipsic, Michael D. Noseworthy, Louise Parker, Grace Parraga, Paul Poirier, Paula Robson, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Alan R. Moody, Sandra E. Black, Eric E. Smith,

This study investigated if scores on a cognitive screen were lower in individuals with higher cardiovascular risk, and those with covert vascular brain injury. Among a middle-aged community-dwelling population, scores on a cognitive screen were lower in individuals with higher cardiovascular risk factors or MRI vascular brain injury. Much of the population attributable risk of low cognitive scores can be attributed to lower educational attainment, higher cardiovascular risk factors, and MRI vascular brain injury.

Read Publication
2019

Harmonization of the Health and Risk Factor Questionnaire data of the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: a descriptive analysis

Authors: Isabel Fortier, Nataliya Dragieva, Matilda Saliba, Camille Craig, Paula J. Robson

This paper describes how data is harmonized the health and risk factor questionnare and provides an overview of information required to use the core data that has been created. The reason for the harmonization is to have a unique data set including data on health and risk factors from over 307000 Canadians.

Read Publication
2018

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: a pan-Canadian platform for research on chronic disease prevention

Authors: Trevor J.B. Dummer, Philip Awadalla, Catherine Boileau, Camille Craig, Isabel Fortier, Vivek Goel, Jason M.T. Hicks, Sébastien Jacquemont, Bartha Maria Knoppers, Nhu Le, Treena McDonald, John McLaughlin, Anne-Marie Mes-Masson, Anne-Monique Nuyt, Lyle J. Palmer, Louise Parker, Mark Purdue, Paula J. Robson, John J. Spinelli, David Thompson, Jennifer Vena, Ma’n Zawati

In order to understand the risk factors for disease, participants across the study were recruited across 5 provinces. Body samples and physical information was collected from these people. They then harmonized this data. The hope out of this paper was that the samples afford strides in research both nationally nad internationally.

Read Publication
2018

The author who wasn’t there? Fairness and attribution in publications following access to population biobanks

Authors: Erika Kleiderman, Amy Pack, Pascal Borry, Ma'n Zawati

This study conducted a document analysis that looked at publication ethics and authorship with population biobanks. In their findings, they reported a 3-step approach: 1) the biobank should be given proper acknowledgement 2) co-authorship should be encouraged to foster colloboration amongst researchers 3) referencing/citiations should be readily available

Read Publication