Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2020

Prediction of Cardiovascular Events by Type I Central Systolic Blood Pressure

Authors: Florence Lamarche, Mohsen Agharazii, François Madore, Rémi Goupil

This study assessed which of central or brachial blood pressure best predicts cardiovascular risk and identified the central SBP threshold associated with increased risk of future cardiovascular events. It was concluded that central BP measured with a type I device is statistically but likely not clinically superior to brachial BP in a general population without prior cardiovascular disease.

Read Publication
2020

Job strain and the incidence of heart diseases: A prospective community study in Quebec, Canada

Authors: Niamh Power, Soyna Deschenes, Floriana Ferri, Norbert Schmitz

CARTaGENE survey data linked with administrative data and Cox regression models were used to examine the association between job strain and heart disease, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioral and clinical factors, and depressive symptoms. It was found that job strain was associated with an increased risk of heart disease in middle-aged women and in men aged 50 years and older. This association was not accounted for by depressive symptoms or sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral factors.

Read Publication
2020

Associations between Neighborhood Walkability, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease in Nova Scotian Adults: An Atlantic PATH Cohort Study

Authors: Melanie Keats, Yunsong Cui, Scott Grandy, Ellen Sweeney, Trevor Dummer

The study investigated the association between neighbourhood walkability and chronic disease. A cross-sectional study was used to determine that there were health protective benefits of higher levels of physical activity and a reduction in the prevalence of certain chronic diseases in areas where there was a higher walk score.

Read Publication
2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

Read Publication
2020

Diet Quality and Food Prices Modify Associations between Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity and Adiposity Outcomes

Authors: Hannah Yang Han, Catherine Paquet, Laurette Dubé, Daiva E Nielsen

This cross-sectional investigation geo-temporally linked CARTaGENE data with in-store retail food environment data to examine interactions between a polygenic risk score (PRS) for obesity and (1) diet quality (n = 6807) and (2) in-store retail food measures (n = 3718). The outcomes included adiposity-related measures and diet quality assessed using the 2010 Canadian-adapted Healthy Eating Index.

Read Publication
2020

Assessing arsenic in human toenail clippings using portable X-ray fluorescence

Authors: David Fleming, Samantha Crook, Colby Evans, Michel Nader, Manuel Atia, Jason Hicks, Ellen Sweeney, Christopher McFarlane, Jong Song Kim, Erin Keltie, Anil Adsesh

Single toenail clippings from 60 Atlantic Canadian participants were assessed for arsenic using a new portable X-ray fluorescence approach. The portable XRF technique used in this study shows promise as a means of assessing arsenic concentration in toenail clippings.

Read Publication
2020

Diet Quality and Neighborhood Environment in the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health Project

Authors: Kaitlyn Gilham, Qianqian Gu, Trevor Dummer, John Spinelli, Rachel Murphy

This study looked at the differences that exist beween diet quality and someone’s geographical location. It was found that diet quality tended to be lower in areas that were were more socially deprived. Areas with socially deprived and high-density areas were associated with lower-quality data.

Read Publication
2020

Assessing the Variation within the Oral Microbiome of Healthy Adults

Authors: Jacob Nearing, Vanessa DeClerq, Johan Van Limbergen, Morgan Langille

This study examined the salivary oral microbiome of 1,049 Atlantic Canadians using 16S rRNA gene sequencing to determine which dietary, lifestyle, and anthropometric features play a role in shaping microbial community composition. Results showed that while many features were significantly associated with oral microbiome composition, no single biological factor explained a variation larger than 2%.

Read Publication
2020

Sunlight exposure, sun‐protective behaviour, and anti‐citrullinated protein antibody positivity: A general population‐based study in Quebec, Canada

Authors: Naizhou Zhao, Audrey Smargiassi, Ines Colmegna, Marie Hudson, Marvin Fritzer, Sasha Bernatsky

This study examined associations between sunlight exposure and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) using general population data in Quebec. The research team studied 7600 people and did not find conclusive associations, but robust positive relationships were observed between industrial PM2.5 emissions and ACPA.

Read Publication
2020

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hemoglobin A1c and breast cancer risk: a nested case–control study from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort

Authors: Tiffany Price, Christine Friedenreich, Paula Robson, Haocheng Li, Darren Brenner

This study examined the associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), common biomarkers of inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively, with breast cancer risk, while adjusting for measures of excess body size. These data suggest that hsCRP may be associated with elevated breast cancer risk, independent of excess body size. However, elevated concentrations of HbA1c did not appear to increase breast cancer risk in apparently healthy women.

Read Publication