Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2021

Examining the etiology of early-onset breast cancer in the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health (CanPath)

Authors: Joy Pader, Robert Basmadjian, Dylan O'Sullivan, Nicole Mealey, Yibing Ruan, Christine Friedenreich, Rachel Murphy, Edwin Wang, May Lynn Quan, Darren Brenner

The objective of this study was to investigate relationships between modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors and early-onset breast cancer among the BC Generations Project, Alberta’s Tomorrow Project and Ontario Health Study. In this study, measures of adiposity, pregnancy history, and familial history of breast cancer are important risk factors for early-onset breast cancer.

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2021

Dietary patterns with combined and site-specific cancer incidence in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort

Authors: Romy Willemsen, Jessica McNeil, Emily Heer, Steven Johnson, Christine Fredenreich, Darren Brenner

This study used data from the Alberta’s Tomorrow Project to examine the association between dietary patterns derived with two methods, and combined and site-specific cancer incidence in Canada.

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2021

The effect of different methods to identify, and scenarios used to address energy intake misestimation on dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis

Authors: Geraldine Lo Siou, Alianu Akawung, Nathan Solbak, Kathryn McDonald, Ala Al Rajabi, Heather Whelan, Sharon Kirkpatrick

This study used self-reported food frequency and physical activity data from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants to compare the revised-Goldberg and the predicted total energy expenditure methods in their ability to identify misreporters of energy intake.

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2021

Towards refining World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention recommendations for red and processed meat intake: insights from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort

Authors: Ala Al Rajabi, Geraldine Lo Siou, Alianu K. Akawung, Kathryn McDonald, Tiffany R. Price, Grace Shen-Tu, Paula J. Robson, Paul J. Veugelers, Katerina Maximova

This study examined the associations of processed meat derived from red versus non-red meats with cancer risk in the Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort of 26 218 adults who reported dietary intake using the Canadian Diet History Questionnaire. Incidence of cancer was obtained through data linkage with the Alberta Cancer Registry.

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2021

A Prospective Analysis of Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Breast Cancer Risk in 2 Provinces in Canada

Authors: Marnie Newell, Sunita Ghosh, Susan Goruk, Mohammedreza Pakseresht, Jennifer Vena, Trevor Dummer, Catherine Field

This study compared participants from BCGP and ATP and examined whether there was an association between fatty acid status and the risk of breast cancer, including location, menopausal status, and waist-to-hip ratio as key variables. Findings suggest that regional variations in fatty acid status influence breast cancer risk and highlights the complexity and difficulty in using fatty acid status to predict breast cancer risk in diverse populations without the consideration of other risk factors.

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2021

Administering a combination of online dietary assessment tools, the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Assessment Tool and Diet History Questionnaire-II, in a cohort of adults in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Nathan Solbak, Paula Robson, Geraldine Lo Siou, Ala Al Rajabi, Seol Paek, Jennifer Vena, Sharon Kirkpatrick

This study determined the feasibility and acceptability of combining the ASA24-2016 and the past-year Diet History Questionnaire web-based tools in a subset of participants in the ATP cohort. The study found that combining ASA24-2016 recalls and the DHQ-II is feasible in this group of ATP participants.

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2020

Social Jetlag and Prostate Cancer Incidence in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project: A Prospective Cohort Study

Authors: Liang Hu, Andrew Harper, Emily Heer, Jessica McNeil, Chao Cao, Yikyung Park, Kevin Martell, Geoffrey Gotto, Grace Shen-Tu, Cheryl Peters, Darren Brenner, Lin Yang

Social jetlag has been linked with obesity, metabolic disorders, and cardiovascular risk in previous research. This study assessed social jetlag in 7455 cancer-free men in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project and followed them for on average 9.6 years, 250 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The study found that the more social jetlag men experienced, the greater their prostate cancer risk was.

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2020

The Importance of Cancer Registry Linkage for Studying Rare Cancers in Prospective Cohorts

Authors: Emily Maplethorpe, Emily V. Walker, Trenton Smith, Faith G. Davis, Yan Yuan

This research study evaluated the validity of self-reported cancer diagnosis in ATP by linking to the Alberta Cancer Registry. The first instance of self-reported cancer in a follow-up survey was compared to the first cancer diagnosis in the ACR after enrollment. The study found that rare cancers were less likely to be captured by active follow-up than common cancers.

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2020

Combinations of modifiable lifestyle behaviours in relation to colorectal cancer risk in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Dylan E. O’Sullivan, Amy Metcalfe, Troy W. R. Hillier, Will D. King, Sangmin Lee, Joy Pader, Darren R. Brenner

The researchers sought to identify distinct clusters of individuals that exhibit unique patterns of modifiable life-style related behaviours and determine how these patterns are associated with the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The team identified 7 unique behaviours where the cancer risk was 2.34-2.87 times higher for the high-risk groups than the low-risk groups.

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2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

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