Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

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2020

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hemoglobin A1c and breast cancer risk: a nested case–control study from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort

Authors: Tiffany Price, Christine Friedenreich, Paula Robson, Haocheng Li, Darren Brenner

This study examined the associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), common biomarkers of inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively, with breast cancer risk, while adjusting for measures of excess body size. These data suggest that hsCRP may be associated with elevated breast cancer risk, independent of excess body size. However, elevated concentrations of HbA1c did not appear to increase breast cancer risk in apparently healthy women.

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2020

Diet Quality and Health Service Utilization for Depression: A Prospective Investigation of Adults in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Shelby Marozoff, Paul Veugelers, Julia Dabravolskaj, Dean Eurich, Ming Ye, Katerina Maximova

This study investigated the association of depression with diet quality by studying dietary patterns of 25,016 participants in the Alberta cohort using data from the past year food frequency questionnaire. It was found that higher quality diets were associated with a lower number of physician visits for depression.

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2020

The Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds: How well does it reflect the Canadian population?

Authors: Ruth E. Hall, Natasa Tusevljak, C. Fangyun Wu, Quazi Ibrahim, Karleen Schulze, Anam M. Khan, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Trevor J.B. Dummer, Jason Hicks, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon K. Teo, Jennifer Vena, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia S. Anand, Jack V. Tu

The representativeness of the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds (CAHHM-HSR) cohort was evaluated by comparing to region matched respondents of the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey Rapid Response module (CCHS-RR). CAHHM-HSR participants were older, more often women, more likely Chinese, and had higher education, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and cardiac testing than the general Canadian population. Despite these differences, the INTERHEART risk score was similar.

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2020

Co-consumption of Vegetables and Fruit, Whole Grains, and Fiber Reduces the Cancer Risk of Red and Processed Meat in a Large Prospective Cohort of Adults from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Katerina Maximova, Elham Khodayari Moez, Julia Dabravolskaj, Alexa Ferdinands, Irina Dinu, Geraldine Siou, Ala Al Rajabi, Paul Veugelers

This study examined whether co-consumption of red and processed meat with key foods items and food constituents recommended for cancer prevention (vegetables and fruit, whole grains, and fiber) mitigates cancer incidence.

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2020

Premature Mortality due to Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, and Leukemia in Canada: A Nationwide Analysis from 1980 to 2015

Authors: Truong-Minh Pham, Grace Shen-Tu, Khanh Hoa Nguyen, Shuang Lu, Douglas Dover, Peter Duggan, Lorraine Shack, Winson Cheung

This study used a novel measure of average lifespan shortened (ALSS) to examine trends in premature mortality caused by hematological cancers in Canada from 1980 to 2015. Results from this study showed that patients with hematological cancers experienced prolonged survival over a 35-year period although the magnitude of these lifespan gains varied by types of hematological cancers.

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2020

Perceived susceptibility to developing cancer and screening for colorectal and prostate cancer: A longitudinal analysis of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Meghan Gilfoyle, Ashok Chaurasia, John Garcia, Mark Oremus

This study looked at ATP participants screened between 2000-2008 to assess the association between perceived susceptibility of developing cancer and being screened via sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy and prostate-specific antigen. Findings suggest health promotion can focus on targeting and heightening personal perceived susceptibility of developing cancer in jurisdictions with low screening rates for colorectal or prostate cancer.

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2020

Associations between the neighbourhood characteristics and body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio: Findings from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Vikram Nichani, Liam Turley, Jennifer Vena, Gavin McCormack

This study estimated the associations between neighbourhood characteristics and self-reported body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) risk categories among Canadian men and women.

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2020

Reduced Cognitive Assessment Scores Among Individuals With Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Detected Vascular Brain Injury

Authors: Sonia S. Anand, Matthias G. Friedrich, Dipika Desai, Karleen M. Schulze, Philip Awadalla, David Busseuil, Trevor J.B. Dummer, Sébastien Jacquemont, Alexander Dick, David Kelton, Anish Kirpalani, Scott A. Lear, Jonathan Leipsic, Michael D. Noseworthy, Louise Parker, Grace Parraga, Paul Poirier, Paula Robson, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Alan R. Moody, Sandra E. Black, Eric E. Smith,

This study investigated if scores on a cognitive screen were lower in individuals with higher cardiovascular risk, and those with covert vascular brain injury. Among a middle-aged community-dwelling population, scores on a cognitive screen were lower in individuals with higher cardiovascular risk factors or MRI vascular brain injury. Much of the population attributable risk of low cognitive scores can be attributed to lower educational attainment, higher cardiovascular risk factors, and MRI vascular brain injury.

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2020

The Epidemiology of Weight Perception: Perceived Versus Self-reported Actual Weight Status among Albertan Adults

Authors: J Linder, L McLaren, G Siou, I Cszimadi, P Robson

They analyzed data from the Tomorrow Project from 7436 people in Alberta between the ages of 35-69 which looked at weight perception accuracy. It seemed that women were more accurate about determining whether they were overweight or not, whereas the men were not always aware.

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