Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2020

The Epidemiology of Weight Perception: Perceived Versus Self-reported Actual Weight Status among Albertan Adults

Authors: J Linder, L McLaren, G Siou, I Cszimadi, P Robson

They analyzed data from the Tomorrow Project from 7436 people in Alberta between the ages of 35-69 which looked at weight perception accuracy. It seemed that women were more accurate about determining whether they were overweight or not, whereas the men were not always aware.

Read Publication
2019

Perceived susceptibility to developing cancer and mammography screening behaviour: a cross-sectional analysis of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: M Gilfoyle, J Garcia, A Chaurasia, M Oremus

This article highlights the percevied suspectibility with cancer screening. It also showed there was higher perceived risk/chance of cancer was associated with mammography screening. They used an individualized approach to encourage more people to get screened.

Read Publication
2019

Validation of drug prescription records for senior patients in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project: Assessing agreement between two population-level administrative pharmaceutical databases in Alberta, Canada.

Authors: Ming Ye, Jennifer Vena, JY Xu, DT Eurich

This study was done to examine the pharamceutical information network (PIN) and the Alberta Blue Cross dataset to see the medical records of all senior patients in Alberta matched up. It was found that the PIN had a fairly good completing at capuring the ABC medications for senior patients in Alberta.

Read Publication
2019

A population-based study of the associations between neighbourhood walkability and different types of physical activity in Canadian men and women.

Authors: Nichani V, Vena, J; Friedenreich, CM; Christie, C; McCormack GR

The purpose for this study was to determine whether there was difference between neighbourhood walkability differed amongst men/women. They examined perceived walkability and examined how the two sexes percevied walkability in their neighbourhoods.

Read Publication
2019

The individual and combined effects of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking on site-specific cancer risk in a prospective cohort of 26,607 adults: results from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project.

Authors: B Viner, AM Barberio, TR Haig, CM Fredenreich, D Brenner

This study examined the invidual and synergistic effects of modifiable lifestyle factors on overall cancer risks. The conclusions of this study were that while alcohol did not really cause a cancer risk, smoking was definitley attributed to be a factor wherein females were more affected. Those who smoked and drank were at a higher risk of developing colon/prostate cancers.

Read Publication
2019

A methodologic framework to evaluate the number of cancers attributable to lifestyle and environment in Alberta

Authors: Anne Grundy, Christine M. Friedenreich, Abbey E. Poirier, Farah Khandwala, Darren R. Brenner

The team wanted to devise a way estimate the number of incident cancers that could be attributed to factors that can be varied or modified in someone`s life. They looked at 24 cancer risk factors and used estimates to quantify an exposure. By having this data, they can figure out ways to modify lifestyle and lower risk of cancer incidence.

Read Publication
2019

Anthropometric changes and risk of diabetes: are there sex differences? A longitudinal study of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Ming Ye, Paula Robson, Dean Eurich, Jennifer Vena, Jian-Yi Xu, Jefferey A Johnson

The objective this was study was see if there was an association with antropometric change and risk of diabetes. There was a positive association between anthropometric changes and risk of diabetes was found more in men than women.

Read Publication
2019

Diet quality and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among South Asians in Alberta.

Authors: CB Chan FB Subhan

A retrospective analysis of data collected from 140 South Asian adults participating in the Alberta’s Tomorrow Project was conducted. Dietary intake was assessed using a questionnaire and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) was used an indicator of overall diet quality and adherence to dietary recommendations made by Health Canada. Central obesity (70%), hypercholesterolemia (27%), and hypertension (14%) were predominant health conditions observed in the study participants.

Read Publication
2019

Harmonization of the Health and Risk Factor Questionnaire data of the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: a descriptive analysis

Authors: Isabel Fortier, Nataliya Dragieva, Matilda Saliba, Camille Craig, Paula J. Robson

This paper describes how data is harmonized the health and risk factor questionnare and provides an overview of information required to use the core data that has been created. The reason for the harmonization is to have a unique data set including data on health and risk factors from over 307000 Canadians.

Read Publication
2019

Impact of adherence to cancer-specific prevention recommendations on subsequent risk of cancer in participants in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project.

Authors: JY Xu, JE Vena, HK Whelan, PJ Robson

This study wanted to see if cancer-specific recommendations actually prevented cancer. They found that those who adhered to said recommendations saw lower risk of develop cancer over time.

Read Publication