Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2020

The association between physical activity and self-rated health in Atlantic Canadians

The population of Atlantic Canada is aging rapidly and has among the highest rates of chronic disease in the country. This cross-sectional study drew data from Atlantic PATH to investigate the association between physical activity and self-rated health among adults in this population. The results suggest that physical activity may help to improve perceived health status of individuals with one or more chronic conditions. The findings support literature suggesting that physical activity can be beneficial for adults as they age with chronic disease.

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2019

Diet Quality among Cancer Survivors and Participants without Cancer: A Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study in the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health Project

This study investigated the diet quality of cancer survivors relative to participants without cancer, overall and by cancer site and time from diagnosis. It found that there was considerable room for dietary improvement regardless of cancer status, highlighting the need for dietary interventions, especially among cancer survivors, who are at higher risk for secondary health problems.

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2019

Anxiety and depression symptoms in adult males in Atlantic Canada with or without a lifetime history of prostate cancer.

Authors: G Illie, Ellen Sweeney, R Rutledge

In this study based on prostate cancer and to examine the assoication between depression and anxiety. They looked at sample size of 6585 participants and found surivors of PCa had 2.45 or 2.05 statistically significant higher odds of screening positive for anxiety/depression

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2019

The Relationship between Anthropometric Measures and Cardiometabolic Health in Shift Work: Findings from the Atlantic PATH Cohort Study

Authors: Ellen Sweeney, Zhijie Yu, Trevor Dummer, Yunsong Cui, Vanessa DeClerq, Cynthia Forbes, Scott Grandy, Melanie Keats, Louise Parker, Anil Adisesh

This article was written to evaluate the relationship between anthropomeric measures and cardiometabolic health in shift workers compared to non-shift workers. They looked at 4155 shift workers and 8258 non-shift workers. There was a slight risk of CVD, obesity, and diabetes among shift workers. It also shown that shift workers were 17% more likely to be obese and 27% more likely to have diabetes.

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2019

Harmonization of the Health and Risk Factor Questionnaire data of the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: a descriptive analysis

Authors: Isabel Fortier, Nataliya Dragieva, Matilda Saliba, Camille Craig, Paula J. Robson

This paper describes how data is harmonized the health and risk factor questionnare and provides an overview of information required to use the core data that has been created. The reason for the harmonization is to have a unique data set including data on health and risk factors from over 307000 Canadians.

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2019

Rural‐Urban Disparities in Total Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Related Health Indicators: An Atlantic PATH Study

Authors: Cynthia Forbes, Zhijie Michael Yu, Yunsong Cui, Vanessa DeClerq, Scott Grandy, Louise Parker, Ellen Sweeney, Trevor Dummer, Melanie Keats

This study was done to compare the sociodemographic/lifestyle characteristics of urban/rural residents in Atlantic Canada. Over 17000 adults were surveyed and multi-linear/logistic regression were done. It was found that rural residents were significantly less likely to be regular or habitual drinkers. Obesity prevalence was much higher out in the Atlantic provinces.

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2018

Fruit and vegetable intake and body adiposity among populations in Eastern Canada: the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health Study

Authors: Vanessa DeClerq, Yunsong Cui, Trevor Dummer, Cynthia Forbes, Scott Grandy,Melanie Keats, Louise Parker, Ellen Sweeney, Zhijie Michael Yu

This was a cross-sectional study that looked at 26340 individuals (7979 men/18361 women). They looked at data on fruits/vegetable intake, sociodemographic and behavioural factors. The consumption of fruits and vegetables was inversely associated with higher body fat in these populations.

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2018

Differences in adiposity and diet quality among individuals with inflammatory bowel disease in Eastern Canada

Authors: Vanessa DeClerq, Morgan Langille, Johan van Limbergen

This study looked at the relationship between diet quality and body composition in participants with IBD. There was a positive correlation between adiposity and those who ate processed grains, excess meats; there was a negative correlation between those who consumed lots of fruits/vegetables, whole grains. There was distinct difference in adiposity and diet quality were observed in individuals

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2018

The author who wasn’t there? Fairness and attribution in publications following access to population biobanks

Authors: Erika Kleiderman, Amy Pack, Pascal Borry, Ma'n Zawati

This study conducted a document analysis that looked at publication ethics and authorship with population biobanks. In their findings, they reported a 3-step approach: 1) the biobank should be given proper acknowledgement 2) co-authorship should be encouraged to foster colloboration amongst researchers 3) referencing/citiations should be readily available

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2017

Association between Diet Quality and Adiposity in the Atlantic PATH Cohort

Authors: Vanessa DeClerq, Yunsong Cui, Trevor Dummer, Cynthia Forbes, Scott Grandy,Melanie Keats, Louise Parker, Ellen Sweeney, Zhijie Michael Yu

This research was done to assess the association between diet quality and adiposity. They found that the diet quality was very different among provinces, an area of concern was people who consumed only 1-2 servings of fruits/vegetables today. Adiposity was positively associated with consumption of excess meat, snack foods, sweetners, diet soft drinks, and fast food. It was shown that people who ate whole grains and green tea had lower levels of adiposity.

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