Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2021

An examination of the role of socioeconomic status in the relationship between depression and prostate cancer survivorship in a population-based sample of men from Atlantic Canada

Authors: Gabriela Ilie, Robert Rutledge, Ellen Sweeney

This study found that the association of depression and prostate cancer still stands when the survivors of prostate cancer are compared to survivors of any other form of cancer, and further indicates that the association is moderated by household income.

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2021

Regional Comparisons of Associations between Physical Activity Levels and Cardiovascular Disease: The Story of Atlantic Canada

Authors: Bartosz Orzel, Melanie Keats, Yunsong Cui, Scott Grandy

The study examined participants’ physical activity levels and the risk of cardiovascular disease based on the region they lived in. The research team found that high physical activity was associated with a 26% reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Regions in Newfoundland and New Brunswick observed higher levels of CVD than Nova Scotia and PEI.

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2020

Associations between Neighborhood Walkability, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease in Nova Scotian Adults: An Atlantic PATH Cohort Study

Authors: Melanie Keats, Yunsong Cui, Vanessa Declercq, Scott Grandy, Ellen Sweeney, Trevor Dummer

The study investigated the association between neighbourhood walkability and chronic disease. A cross-sectional study was used to determine that there were health protective benefits of higher levels of physical activity and a reduction in the prevalence of certain chronic diseases in areas where there was a higher walk score.

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2020

Diabetes, Brain Infarcts, Cognition and Small Vessels in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Study

Authors: Hertzel Gerstein, Eric Smith, Chinthanie Ramasundarahettige, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Sandra Black, Trevor Dummer, Jason Hicks, Alan Moody, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon Teo, Jennifer Vena, Salim Yusuf, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia Anand

The CAHHM study collected brain and carotid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two cognitive tests (DSST and MoCA) in a cross-sectional sample of 7,733 men and women. It was concluded that small vessel disease characterizes much of the relationship between diabetes and vascular brain injury. However, additional factors are required to disentangle the relationship between diabetes and cognitive impairment.

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2020

Assessing arsenic in human toenail clippings using portable X-ray fluorescence

Authors: David Fleming, Samantha Crook, Colby Evans, Michel Nader, Manuel Atia, Jason Hicks, Ellen Sweeney, Christopher McFarlane, Jong Song Kim, Erin Keltie, Anil Adsesh

Single toenail clippings from 60 Atlantic Canadian participants were assessed for arsenic using a new portable X-ray fluorescence approach. The portable XRF technique used in this study shows promise as a means of assessing arsenic concentration in toenail clippings.

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2020

Diet Quality and Neighborhood Environment in the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health Project

Authors: Kaitlyn Gilham, Qianqian Gu, Trevor Dummer, John Spinelli, Rachel Murphy

This study looked at the differences that exist beween diet quality and someone’s geographical location. It was found that diet quality tended to be lower in areas that were were more socially deprived. Areas with socially deprived and high-density areas were associated with lower-quality data.

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2020

Assessing the Variation within the Oral Microbiome of Healthy Adults

Authors: Jacob Nearing, Vanessa DeClerq, Johan Van Limbergen, Morgan Langille

This study examined the salivary oral microbiome of 1,049 Atlantic Canadians using 16S rRNA gene sequencing to determine which dietary, lifestyle, and anthropometric features play a role in shaping microbial community composition. Results showed that while many features were significantly associated with oral microbiome composition, no single biological factor explained a variation larger than 2%.

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2020

The Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds: How well does it reflect the Canadian population?

Authors: Ruth E. Hall, Natasa Tusevljak, C. Fangyun Wu, Quazi Ibrahim, Karleen Schulze, Anam M. Khan, Dipika Desai, Philip Awadalla, Philippe Broet, Trevor J.B. Dummer, Jason Hicks, Jean-Claude Tardif, Koon K. Teo, Jennifer Vena, Douglas Lee, Matthias Friedrich, Sonia S. Anand, Jack V. Tu

The representativeness of the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds (CAHHM-HSR) cohort was evaluated by comparing to region matched respondents of the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey Rapid Response module (CCHS-RR). CAHHM-HSR participants were older, more often women, more likely Chinese, and had higher education, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and cardiac testing than the general Canadian population. Despite these differences, the INTERHEART risk score was similar.

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2020

Portable X-ray Fluorescence of Zinc Applied to Human Toenail Clippings

Authors: David E.B.Fleming, Samantha L. Crook, Colby T. Evans, Michel N. Nader, Manuel Atia, Jason M. T. Hicks, Ellen Sweeney, Christopher R. McFarlane, Jong Sung Kim, Erin Keltie, Anil Adisesh

The purpose of this study was to see if it was feasible to measure the zinc levels in the fingernails of people. They used an x-ray fluorescence to measure how much zinc was present in the nails. It was found that the latter was very sensitive at detecting zinc in the nail and would be able to measure fluctuating levels of zinc as time went on.

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2020

Burden of multimorbidity and polypharmacy among cancer survivors: a population-based nested case–control study

Authors: Melanie Keats, Yunsong Cui, Vanessa DeClerq, Scott Grandy, Ellen Sweeney, Trevor Dummer

The purpose of this study was to investigate if adult cancer survivors showed more than one comorbidity while taking medications. The article found multimorbities in 53% of cancer survivors. Those on multiple medications showed much higher results.

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