Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2023

Non-fasting lipids and cardiovascular disease in those with and without diabetes in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project: A prospective cohort study

Authors: Olivia R. Weaver, Ming Ye, Jennifer E. Vena, Dean T. Eurich, Spencer D. Proctor

This study’s objective was to assess the relationship of non-fasting remnant cholesterol (RC) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in those with and without diabetes using data from 13,631 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants. Researchers found that elevated non-fasting RC was associated with increased CVD risk in middle and older-aged adults without diabetes.

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2023

Impact of Comorbidity on Hospitalization and Emergency Room Visits in Adults With Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Ming Ye, Jennifer E Vena, Jeffrey A Johnson, Grace Shen-Tu, Dean T Eurich

Using data from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project, Ye et al. investigated the impact of comorbidities on hospitalization and emergency room visits in people with diabetes. Over the 5-year study period, the authors observed a significant association between the number of comorbidities and increased healthcare utilization among the 2,110 cases in the study population.

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2022

Personalized breast cancer onset prediction from lifestyle and health history information

Authors: Shi-Ang Qi, Neeraj Kumar, Jian-Yi Xu, Jaykumar Patel, Sambasivarao Damaraju, Grace Shen-Tu, Russell Greiner

This article proposes a method for predicting when a woman will develop breast cancer (Bca) based on health and lifestyle history using data from 18,288 women in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project. Their approach produced seven actionable lifestyle features that a woman can modify to show how the model can predict the effects of such changes. This method can be used to identify interventions for those with a greater likelihood of developing BCa.

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2022

Patterns and predictors of adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Olivia K Loewen, Navjot Sandila, Grace Shen-Tu, Jennifer E Vena, Huiming Yang, Kara Patterson, Jian-Yi Xu

This study examined screening patterns in almost 5,000 women in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project. Most participants were up-to-date with screening at enrollment and follow-up, but 21.6% were not up-to-date at follow-up, and 3.2% had never participated. Having a family doctor was the strongest predictor of regular screening, while current smokers were less likely to be regular screeners. The study highlights the importance of promoting awareness of screening recommendations and the role of family doctors in encouraging screening.

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2022

Association of dairy consumption patterns with the incidence of type 2 diabetes: Findings from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Emad Yuzbashian, Mohammadreza Pakseresht, Jennifer Vena, Catherine B Chan

Researchers investigated the relationship between dairy consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) with data from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project (ATP). 15,016 women and 8,615 men completed a food-frequency questionnaire and were followed up over time to determine T2D incidence. They found that higher consumption of whole milk, regular cheese, and non-fat milk was associated with decreased risk of incident T2D only in men. The study suggests that combining different dairy products might be good for men’s health.

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2022

Developing a Socioeconomic Status Index for Chronic Disease Prevention Research in Canada

Authors: Elham Khodayari Moez, Katerina Maximova, Shannon Sim, Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan, Roman Pabayo

Researchers developed a socioeconomic status (SES) index and assessed its associations with smoking amongst 17,371 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants. They found that their index was negatively related to smoking intensity.

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2022

Anti-Hyperglycemic Medication Adherence and Health Services Utilization in People with Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Ming Ye, Jennifer E Vena, Jeffrey A Johnson, Grace Shen-Tu, Dean T Eurich

This study aimed to describe how time-varying anti-hyperglycemic medication adherence relates to healthcare utilization for those with diabetes. Using data from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants, researchers found that poor drug adherence related to higher healthcare utilization in the short term but less over the long term.

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2022

Health-Related and Behavioral Factors Associated With Lung Cancer Stage at Diagnosis: Observations From Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Michelle L. Aktary, Monica Ghebrial, Qinggang Wang, Lorraine Shack, Paula J. Robson, Karen A. Kopciuk

This study examined sociodemographic characteristics and health-related factors and their associations with subsequent lung cancer stage at diagnosis. Using data from 221 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants, researchers found that a history of sunburn in the past year and more prostate-specific antigen tests were protective against late-stage lung cancer diagnosis, whereas physical activity increased late-stage cancer diagnosis odds.

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2022

Pre-diagnosis lifestyle, health history and psychosocial factors associated with stage at breast cancer diagnosis – Potential targets to shift stage earlier

Authors: Qinggang Wang, Michelle L. Aktary, John J. Spinelli, Lorraine Shack, Paula J.Robson, Karen A. Kopciuk

This study aimed to examine associations between risk factors for breast cancer diagnosis, prior to and and at diagnosis. Some protective factors include older age at diagnosis, high household income, parity, smoking, spending time in the sun (high ultraviolet), having a mammogram, and high daily protein intake. Factors that increase risk of later stage at diagnosis include comorbidities, stressful situations, and high daily caloric intake.

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2022

Lifestyle factors and lung cancer risk among never smokers in the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health (CanPath)

Authors: Rachel Murphy, Maryam Darvishian, Jia Qi, Yixian Chen, Quincy Chu, Jennifer Vena, Trevor J B Dummer, Nhu Le, Ellen Sweeney, Vanessa DeClercq, Scott A Grandy, Melanie R Keats, Yunsong Cui, Philip Awadalla, Darren R Brenner, Parveen Bhatti

Data from 950 CanPath participants were analyzed to understand why 15-25% of lung cancers occur in never smokers. Researchers found a link between lung cancer risk, sleep, and fruit and vegetable intake amongst never smokers.

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