Publications

These publications are examples of research made possible with data from CanPath and its regional cohorts.

2022

Developing a Socioeconomic Status Index for Chronic Disease Prevention Research in Canada

Authors: Elham Khodayari Moez, Katerina Maximova, Shannon Sim, Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan, Roman Pabayo

Researchers developed a socioeconomic status (SES) index and assessed its associations with smoking amongst 17,371 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants. They found that their index was negatively related to smoking intensity.

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2022

Anti-Hyperglycemic Medication Adherence and Health Services Utilization in People with Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study of Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Ming Ye, Jennifer E Vena, Jeffrey A Johnson, Grace Shen-Tu, Dean T Eurich

This study aimed to describe how time-varying anti-hyperglycemic medication adherence relates to healthcare utilization for those with diabetes. Using data from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants, researchers found that poor drug adherence related to higher healthcare utilization in the short term but less over the long term.

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2022

Health-Related and Behavioral Factors Associated With Lung Cancer Stage at Diagnosis: Observations From Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Michelle L. Aktary, Monica Ghebrial, Qinggang Wang, Lorraine Shack, Paula J. Robson, Karen A. Kopciuk

This study examined sociodemographic characteristics and health-related factors and their associations with subsequent lung cancer stage at diagnosis. Using data from 221 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants, researchers found that a history of sunburn in the past year and more prostate-specific antigen tests were protective against late-stage lung cancer diagnosis, whereas physical activity increased late-stage cancer diagnosis odds.

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2022

Pre-diagnosis lifestyle, health history and psychosocial factors associated with stage at breast cancer diagnosis – Potential targets to shift stage earlier

Authors: Qinggang Wang, Michelle L. Aktary, John J. Spinelli, Lorraine Shack, Paula J.Robson, Karen A. Kopciuk

This study aimed to examine associations between risk factors for breast cancer diagnosis, prior to and and at diagnosis. Some protective factors include older age at diagnosis, high household income, parity, smoking, spending time in the sun (high ultraviolet), having a mammogram, and high daily protein intake. Factors that increase risk of later stage at diagnosis include comorbidities, stressful situations, and high daily caloric intake.

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2022

Lifestyle factors and lung cancer risk among never smokers in the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health (CanPath)

Authors: Rachel Murphy, Maryam Darvishian, Jia Qi, Yixian Chen, Quincy Chu, Jennifer Vena, Trevor J B Dummer, Nhu Le, Ellen Sweeney, Vanessa DeClercq, Scott A Grandy, Melanie R Keats, Yunsong Cui, Philip Awadalla, Darren R Brenner, Parveen Bhatti

Data from 950 CanPath participants were analyzed to understand why 15-25% of lung cancers occur in never smokers. Researchers found a link between lung cancer risk, sleep, and fruit and vegetable intake amongst never smokers.

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2021

Predictors of CRC Stage at Diagnosis among Male and Female Adults Participating in a Prospective Cohort Study: Findings from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Authors: Monica Ghebrial, Michelle L. Aktary, Qinggang Wang, John J. Spinelli, Lorraine Shack, Paula J. Robson, Karen A. Kopciuk

This study aimed to uncover factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) at diagnosis in 267 Alberta Tomorrow Project participants. Researchers found that social support, having children, and caffeine intake were strong CRC stage predictors at diagnosis for males. In contrast, CRC family history, pregnancy, hysterectomy, menopausal hormone therapy, Pap test lifetime number, and household physical activity were strong CRC predictors at diagnosis for females.

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2021

Chronic Disease Surveillance in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project using Administrative Health Data

Authors: Ming Ye, Jennifer Vena, Jeffrey Johnson, Grace Shen-Tu, Dean Eurich

This study linked data from 52,770 Alberta’s Tomorrow Project participants with Alberta Health data to describe the prevalence and incidence of chronic diseases. Researchers found an increase in chronic diseases among the cohort, especially for cardiovascular diseases and multimorbidity.

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2021

Towards refining World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention recommendations for red and processed meat intake: insights from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort

Authors: Ala Al Rajabi, Geraldine Lo Siou, Alianu K. Akawung, Kathryn McDonald, Tiffany R. Price, Grace Shen-Tu, Paula J. Robson, Paul J. Veugelers, Katerina Maximova

This study examined the associations of processed meat derived from red versus non-red meats with cancer risk in the Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort of 26 218 adults who reported dietary intake using the Canadian Diet History Questionnaire. Incidence of cancer was obtained through data linkage with the Alberta Cancer Registry.

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2021

A Prospective Analysis of Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Breast Cancer Risk in 2 Provinces in Canada

Authors: Marnie Newell, Sunita Ghosh, Susan Goruk, Mohammedreza Pakseresht, Jennifer Vena, Trevor Dummer, Catherine Field

This study compared participants from BCGP and ATP and examined whether there was an association between fatty acid status and the risk of breast cancer, including location, menopausal status, and waist-to-hip ratio as key variables. Findings suggest that regional variations in fatty acid status influence breast cancer risk and highlights the complexity and difficulty in using fatty acid status to predict breast cancer risk in diverse populations without the consideration of other risk factors.

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2020

The Importance of Cancer Registry Linkage for Studying Rare Cancers in Prospective Cohorts

Authors: Emily Maplethorpe, Emily V. Walker, Trenton Smith, Faith G. Davis, Yan Yuan

This research study evaluated the validity of self-reported cancer diagnosis in ATP by linking to the Alberta Cancer Registry. The first instance of self-reported cancer in a follow-up survey was compared to the first cancer diagnosis in the ACR after enrollment. The study found that rare cancers were less likely to be captured by active follow-up than common cancers.

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